Globally, there are an estimated 36.7 million people living with HIV. More than 35 million people have died as a result, making it one of the most destructive pandemics in history. Many people still don’t know the facts about how to protect themselves and others, and stigma and discrimination remain a reality for people living with the condition. People living with HIV are also more likely to experience poverty, hardship and inequalities.

Marking World AIDS Day shows a genuine commitment to equality and diversity.

We are winning the fight against HIV, but we are losing the fight against ignorance. HIV diagnoses are falling in the UK, meaning the spread of the virus is slowing down, but the fight is not just about the virus. There are still 101,000 people living with HIV in the UK, there is no cure, and people still face ignorance and discrimination that can limit their opportunities, preventing them from living full and happy lives. HIV means you are more likely to live in poverty, and more likely to have poor mental health.

Although the epidemic is slowing in the UK, nearly half of people who test positive are finding out they have HIV very late, meaning the virus may have damaged their health permanently.

This World AIDS Day, use these materials to help raise awareness in your workplace, and raise vital funds to help end new transmissions, end stigma and end the inequalities faced by people living with HIV.

Find out more from the National AIDS Trust website.